Tag Archives: Jewelry Gatherings

What is Immersive Design?

HelenDriggs Line Sape Form

Line, Shape and Form are the three most used Design Elements for jewelers.

Lately, I’ve been bombarded with many questions about Design. You see, next weekend, I hope to embark on a new series of site-specific Immersive Design Workshops I have created to help jewelry makers who may not have a formal education in Art or Design understand what exactly design is. My hope for this series is to show how to consciously use the Elements and Principals of Design to create new jewelry works. As an artist, I want to introduce you to the new ways you too can see the world around us that will open all new avenues to creating your own jewelry. But first, let’s address a scary word to the uninitiated: Design.

 

Understandably, Design is a hard concept to get across to a group of folks who may have been conditioned to just make jewelry during workshops or classes that spring from project-based ways of working.

 

We can’t help it — as jewelers, we use materials and techniques to create objects. We make a thing. The only way to learn how to use a specific technique or material is to act it out with something real. So, there has to be some wearable or hold-able result to wrap our hands and minds around, and every teacher must come up with some object to copy that hopefully achieves the results that she hopes to get across during that class. It’s no wonder Design often is sidelined in the process. You are there to copy a thing. Sad, but too true. But please consider this: if you intend to go beyond copying works that others have designed to solve a particular set of teaching objectives, Design eventually has to come into your skills arsenal. I hope I can help you.

Design is a hard concept to communicate using words, because much of it comes from intuitive, feeling or purely visual places — we see or feel or deduce a thing, and then we set about expressing those qualities during the creation of an object. Simply stated, Design is the sum of Form plus Function. As a trained Graphic Designer, I love art and design. I live for design. And, there’s a huge world of exciting and beautiful 2D design I won’t go into here, because we are talking jewelry, right?

HelenDriggs sketchbook

Art: your sketchbook is the place for unbridled expression. Just draw like nobody is watching you!

The interesting thing about jewelry design is that it not only encompasses Art, it also involves Craft. For many, Art and Craft are the same thing, but consider this: there are ways to craft an object that is well designed, extremely useful and which also may or may not simultaneously be a beautiful work of art. Art, Craft and Design can all exist together in one object — or not. So, what the heck?

 

 

Let’s start at the beginning: Art. Art is a human need to express something in a creative way. It’s communication of a feeling, idea, or emotion. It can be beautiful or not. Whether 2D or 3D, Art makes you see or feel something using a creative way.

Helen Driggs Technical Samples

Craft: Models and technical samples are a way to work out fabrication issues while you develop materials and tool mastery .

Then, there is Craft. As jewelers, Craft is our guiding light. Craftsmanship is probably the most important skill we can master, and it takes practice and expertise with many tools and many materials to become a jeweler who makes objects with fine craftsmanship. You don’t need to be an artist to be a fine craftsman, though.
Believe it or not, the mechanical skills required to craft any object can be passed on to other people who can copy or even duplicate the object if they have spent enough time practicing or developing those skills. I am not saying this is easy, because there is tool mastery, and mastery of materials — but you don’t need to be an artist to have them.

 

So what is Design? Like art, design is a human expression of creativity. But design is a process that solves a problem. A designer is an artist who “solves” things through planning, and organized thought and then follows a process to create an object that serves some purpose or some function. As jewelers, the “solution” is usually some object to be worn on the body. Sure, you can craft an object without designing something new or different — like a simple metal band ring. But what if you want to make a band ring nobody has ever thought of before? Welcome to the world of Design.

techjournal

Design: Technical Journals are imperative for jewelers to keep track of patterns, fabrication steps, layouts and plans.

The language of Design is easily understood. There are Elements and Principles and Disciplines and Categories of Design. My Immersive Design Workshop will help you unlock your potential by mastering the Design Language in a fun and approachable way. For two and a half days, we will work together as a team in a location that allows us to go out, look, see, feel, explore and understand with our senses and our hands and minds. You will walk, draw, learn, investigate new ways of welcoming the muse, master the language of design, and learn dozens of new tricks to get in touch with your very own artistic genius already living inside of you. I will show you how to use what you see, hear and are intrigued by to jump start what’s already there. And we will have fun while we do it. There is work too, so don’t think this will be a cake walk — although there will be food, too… It is New York, after all.
Need more info?
Details can be found here: Helen’s Immersive Design Workshop, September 23-25, 2016.

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New Immersive Design Workshop

Ever since the late 1940s, Greenwich Village and other neighborhoods in New York City have been thriving centers for Art and Design. Many well-known modernist jewelers took up residence there post World War II, like Sam Kramer, Art Smith, Irena Brynner, Ed Weiner and Frank Rebajes and NYC became one of the most thriving centers for Wearable Art in the states.
“The city” has always been a magnet for the best, brightest, hippest, most innovative and talented in the arts, and the constant inspiration of museums, galleries, design schools, studios, shops and businesses, citizens of the world and other artistic delights awaits.
Every time I go to New York, I come home full of ideas and energy, and I can’t wait to sit at my bench and make. It’s fun to discover, look at, breathe in and feel the pulse of the Big Apple. What’s even more fun is when you are there unhurried, free, and with kindred spirits who are also open to what the Muse will bring. This kind of contagious fun is the most creative kind. As an experienced teacher and a mom, I recognize it for what it truly is, and see it as something every child (um, I mean artist) needs to grow and thrive: Parallel Play.

Ask yourself this: When is the last time you hung out with your pals and gave yourself permission to just experiment together and make something completely different from what you normally do for the sheer delight of doing it? Sound fun? It is…

In that vein, I am pleased to announce that I will be forming a loose “collective” of like-minded souls who will meet regularly (or irregularly) in the city to come together as an informal team of makers. As your “leader,” I will form an itinerary and curriculum with specific object-making goals for each immersive class. We will walk, visit museums, galleries, shops, or places around town to gather inspiration. We’ll work together at the Studio (and independently afterward) and also stay in touch beyond that to help each other and the group as a whole to reach specific goals by specific deadlines. You will be responsible for meeting the goals because the group will be relying on you. We’ll trade ideas and techniques and create a collection of individual jewelry works based on themes, concepts and exchange. Our Makers will constantly evolve, grow and change, but the framework of what we do will remain constant. You will make your own work, and you will inspire other makers too. We will work in a safe and nurturing environment and build community using the city as our muse. And we will create an interesting body of wearable art to share with and inspire other makers. You will learn about design and how to be more confident about what you do with it.
If you want to (or need to) jump start yourself, would like to get away to a fun place with good food, do something inspirational, cut loose, make new friends, be open to something positive that will help you grow, or all of the above, I hope to see you in the city!

HarryBertoia

Brooch by Harry Bertoia  from the Museum of Art and Design’s current exhibition of his jewelry and sculpture.

IrvingPotter

Pendant from Irving Potter; another piece in the MAD’s permanent collection

Interested? Here’s what I have so far. I know this seems a teeny bit vague, but I’m still formulating and planning the best experience for you. I will update as we go, but this much is certain:

Helen’s Immersive Manhattan Design Experience: One
September 23-25, 2016; Class limited to 8 students.
Sign up: Call Tevel at Allcraft Tools (800) 645-7124 for class fee and to reserve your spot. Based on demand, a second session of Design Experience: One may be scheduled, so watch this space for updates.
Location: Downtown New York City, meetup location and times TBA.
Please note: Museum fees, transport and meals are not included. For distance travelers, reduced rate hotel information is being investigated, updates to come shortly. We will use transit and have use of a fully-equipped jewelry studio, with tools and equipment available all day Sunday and at other times as required during the weekend.
There will be a materials list or purchasable kit available, as well as a final syllabus and suggested tool list. You will need a dedicated sketchbook or journal, and the prime requirements for success are to be courageous, have an open mind, share well, and wear some good walking shoes.

Preliminary Syllabus …
Friday, Day One: Gather. If you arrive early Friday, we’ll meet up at the Studio between 3 and 4 pm for light refreshments to mix as members of the collective, distribute materials, discuss goals and directions. The official start will be an evening Museum visit beginning at 5pm with exposure to a plethora of food choices that evening for dinner.

Saturday, Day Two: Collect, Explore and Interact. We will hunt, sketch, photograph, look, learn and see. There will be games. This is a day of discovering what it’s like to be a studio jewelry artist in New York. Final organization of a walking tour is underway. As we go, we will determine the best ways to meet our collective and individual goals for the weekend and by the end of day we will have our individual assignments.

Sunday, Day Three: Make. We’ll have all day in the studio to explore our ideas and experiment with design concepts. Each member of the team will design a concept board and begin to fabricate one work that solves their “problem.” I will demo a group of design and fabrication techniques relevant to the class to get you started, but we will all work together as a design team to help each other. You’ll go home with homework, too.

If there are questions, comment here. I can’t wait to see you there!

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What’s on your Bench?

I love to work. It’s so delicious to sit down at the bench and play with a wide range of fun and inspiring stuff and let the old gray matter go gonzo. I’ve had a hard few months helping my sister navigate the dark waters of a medical crisis, and now she’s nearing home port. The joy I feel for her eclipses all the hard and nasty stuff on my plate right now, and somehow I have managed to stay strong, help her as I can, and keep the eye on the prize while steering us straight. Sorry I’ve been away, but she is more important.

Now that we are here, I am actually happily excited for the near future. Life is good.

Speaking of the near future, Bead Fest is coming, and in case you aren’t connected, I’ve got some fun new classes on deck that I am making sample objects for. There are two new ones I LOVE: No Torch Captures and Connections, and Urban Conchos. Both are a departure for me — they are technique driven and intended to stretch your design skills, rather than technique driven and intended to increase your tool mastery — but don’t worry, I’ve still got tool classes too, lol.

And, my most awesome teacher’s assistant (the aforementioned super sister) will be there helping you/me/us and playing really good setup tunes, troubleshooting your Dremel collets, standing by you as you rock the Genies, and running the shop — so I can totally focus on giving you a great class. What would we do without her, right?

So, here’s a peek at what’s on my bench now. If something looks fun, try it. I’d love to see you in class if you can come!

helen driggs jewelry

I’ve been cutting some fun materials to connect via rivets and other methods.

helen driggs tools

This is for Urban Conchos — and whoa! check out the antique pipe flaring sets I found at the Flea.

captures and connect driggs

One of the target objects for Captures and Connections.

helen driggs bench

I scored a nice lot of Bamboo Knitting Needles at a yard sale last week. Soon, I will cut them up for pendants.

Let’s have fun together and celebrate the end of a hard journey. Feel free to come by and say Hi to my sister and I — even if you aren’t in class. For those of you already coming, I can’t wait to play with you in class.

PS: It’s been rough, but now that we are almost home, I promise to visit you here more often. See you soon and thanks for your kind words, well wishes and support.


Catching Up on Things…

So, yeah. You may have noticed I’ve been otherwise occupied for some time now, as I’ve been dealing with a few real life issues in my family. But good news: we are out of the woods and into the light now. Sorry for abandoning you, but as they say: family first!
Last weekend, I was very busy teaching all-day and two-day workshops at BeadFest Spring, and I’m sad to report it’s going to be the last show of a 10-year run for that particular event. I must say I am kind of sad to see it go, because that’s how I made the connection with the publishing company I work for, I met my current boss, and got my “dream”job as an editor for Lapidary Journal.
I did love April in Oaks every spring — even when it rained, or snowed, or was too cold, or too warm — because I love meeting new students and starting the warm season energized, inspired and ready to work. But, don’t despair! The annual August BeadFest Show is and will still be on the books, and for sure I will be teaching there every year.
On that note, this is my usual post-BeadFest debriefing, where I answer any and all questions that came in after class from students (so far) and I will continue to add to it through the rest of the month to capture any stragglers. So, without further adieu…

Q: Hi Helen,
I attended your amazing cab making class on Saturday at Beadfest. I planned to order diamond drill bits from the company I usually order metals and materials but when I checked into it I learned that they are very weak on lapidary supplies 😦
Can you recommend a couple of suppliers and which bits you find to be the most durable and reliable. Also, do you have any experience with Diamond Pacific’s Pixie Grinder/Polisher. I know… it’s hard to take a lapidary machine named “Pixie” seriously… but now, thanks to you, I REALLLLLY want to work with stones and the big boy Genie is to much $$$ at the moment. My guess is I should save my pennies for the real deal and not mess with a machine built for rock hounds living in an RV. It’s definitely time for the Spirflame torch to find a new home and make room for new equipment.
Thanks a bunch!
— Gina

A: Hi Gina!
I Like LASCO Diamond for shaped diamond tips for the flex shaft, and the Crystolite brand “Triple Ripple” Diamond Drill Bits. I like The Gem Shop, Inc. and Kingsley North as a great all around Lapidary suppliers, and don’t forget — Diamond Pacific is a full service lapidary and jewelry suppler as well.
For my hands, the Pixie is way too small. I owned a used one for about 6 months, and like all DP equipment, it’s fabulous, really well made and durable. My only “problem” was the petiteness of it  — I could span 4 wheels by stretching out my hand from thumb tip to pinky tip, and needless to say, I went right for a Genie and never looked back. I will be teaching Lapidary again at BeadFest in August, so stop by and say Hi!


Q: Where do you get metal and tools?

A: My favorite suppliers for metals and general metalwork and jewelry making tools are varied. I do have regulars, though:

Metalliferous in New York is always worth the trip for metals, tools, beads, supplies, discontinued parts, findings, chain and other needs. the Store and Mail Order Department is at: 34 West 46th Street; 3rd Floor, New York, NY 10036

Allcraft Tools, also in New York is another not-to-miss vendor. They have a website in progress, however I always suggest calling: 800-645-7124. If you want to go, they are located at: 135 West 29 St.; Suite 205, New York, NY 10001

Rio Grande is a large jewelry supply house located in Albuquerque, NM. They have all the major brand name tools and are well stocked in precious metals and materials for the serious hobbyist to the professional bench jeweler. Their online store can’t be beat when you need something right now. Get on their mailing list for a thick fully illustrated catalog, and browse their giant library of tip and trick videos, tool use videos and instructional materials as well as call the live tech support team during the day. 800-545-6566


That’s it for the moment, guys! Thanks for coming to class and I’ll blog again as soon as I get my studio straightened up… Ciao!


On the Radio!

Quick hit here… Just finished a Metalsmith Benchtalk chat with Jay Whaley on Blog Talk Radio. If you missed it, click this link and listen to the recording. I had loads of fun! Nite!


Tips for Tucson

One of my students is headed to Tucson for the first time this winter, so she asked me for some advice. What a loaded question. Tucson (otherwise known as the annual Tucson Gem, Mineral, Bead, Jewelry, etc. Shows) is such a vast topic, it’s really hard to explain the concept to the uninitiated. Here is a feeble start if you don’t know about it at all:

Every year, beginning around the last week of January, the city of Tucson in Arizona becomes the epicenter for anything and everything that is directly or even remotely connected in some way to minerals, gemstones, jewelry, jewelry making, embellished or decorated apparel, and accessories. For about three and a half weeks, you’ll find retail and wholesale beads, cut stones, tools, supplies, materials, stone, objects, finished goods, findings, display, ephemera, vintage stock, precious and non-precious material and new, unusual, and unexpected objects of delight in the hotels, public spaces, convention center, and seemingly every vacant lot capable of hosting one of those big, white epic tents they put up for events. In short, Tucson is heaven on earth for the jewelry minded. On the downside, it can also be exhausting, expensive and confusing if you haven’t got a plan. I’ve been there for 7 years running, and consider myself pretty efficient on navigation concerning Tucson, so here are my top ten tips for going:

Need a bracelet? There are thousands of tables just like this all over the city

Need a bracelet? There are thousands of tables just like this all over the city

1. Set a strict daily budget and adhere to it. It’s easy to blow the bankroll there, because there is so much good stuff. Self control is critical — unless of course, you are on an unlimited budget, in which case, call me and I will be willing to be your companion personal shopper for a mere 2% commission. All kidding aside, I discipline myself with a cash economy when I am there. Each day, I make an ATM withdraw of my daily budget and tuck the cash in the wallet. The plastic remains in the hotel safe to avoid temptation. When the cash is gone, I am done for the day.

2. Determine need vs. want — before you leave home. Make sure you get what you need first, then spend the rest of your cash on what you want. It’s easy to get swept away by the great deals and seduction of cool stuff, however if you miss getting what you went for, you’ll hate yourself when you get home.

African Masks

I always visit the African Art Village. It’s a photographer’s dream.

3. Travel light. You will need room in your suitcase. I choose a color scheme and bring clothes I can layer, mix, and match. The temperature can fluctuate 30 degrees from morning to night, and the city is ringed with mountains — you never know what the desert will do. Comfy shoes are a must. There are stores in Tucson if you forget something.

4. Don’t forget to drink water and eat regular meals. Ditto on the desert here. Dehydration can really ruin your day. And lack of food will give you stupid-head and make you susceptible to overspending. Been there, done that.

5. Flat Rate Priority Mail. I bring one medium box for each day of my trip and two rolls of reinforced packing tape, some bubble wrap and a thick black sharpie. Don’t rely on the post office to have these things, bring them to be sure. Each evening, I put all the catalogs, cards, notes and purchases into the boxes, pad it with dirty socks in plastic bags, and take it to the all-night self-service post office. Insure it, track it, stick on the label and drop it in the bin. You sure don’t want the weight in your suitcase going home.

Ocean Jasper

I adore the mustard yellow Ocean Jasper. If you know color, you’ll realize how useful this hue is…

6. Register in advance for credentialed shows. Visit the Tucson Show Guide website to figure out what you’ll see when. If a show is Wholesale only, see if you can fill out the Buyer’s Badge credential form online.
Then you can usually jump the line at the show and hit “Will Call” to pick up your badge, saving 20-40 minutes of line waiting. But bring your wholesale credentials (and several photocopies) with you, because you’ll need them constantly in the wholesale shows as you purchase.

7. Plan your attack before you leave home. I look at the date range for my selected shows, and try to visit them in logical order. I do the most critical things first, while I am sharp, awake, and still have money. The first thing I always conquer is my student kit needs for the coming teaching season. Then, I conquer replenishing my personal stash. After that, I am open to seduction. I always carry my credentials, business cards, shopping list, notebook and pen and camera to take notes. If you have time, scout first, make notes, then go back to buy after you’ve comparison-shopped.

Bucketloads of turquoise rough from every locality. Yum.

Bucket loads of turquoise rough from every locality. Yum.

8. Try one show per promoter to get a feel for what you like. There are several promoters with several locations each. Many of the vendors set up tables in each location a promoter has, so you’ll find the same stuff at different places. That’s a time-waster if you don’t have much time to spare, so pick one location per promoter and commit. You’ll never see everything anyway, so accept it and move along.

9. Collect business cards and booth numbers if you plan on continuing to do business with a particular vendor. I usually use my cell phone camera to record info I want to get back to — I will shoot the show banner at the start of the day, then as I find stuff I am intrigued by, I shoot booth numbers/names and then the actual stuff I am interested in. That evening, while it’s fresh in my head, I look at the photos, write out some notes in the notebook and tape the business card next to the notes to refresh the old gray matter when I get home.

Aquamarine

Yes, that’s a $45K aquamarine specimen. Uncut. Just the way nature intended.

10. Have some fun. It’s so easy to get sucked into the exhausting feeding frenzy of consumption when you get to Tucson, but remember to look up and out once in a while. The city is beautiful, and if like me, you are coming from somewhere cold, gray, and dreary, it will be a delight to stand in the golden sunshine and look at the rosy sunset every evening. Especially if you are holding a cold Margarita and eating al fresca at the same time.

So, that’s it. In case you are interested, my must-hit shows are Tucson Electric Park (Kino Sports complex), The Pueblo Show, The African Art Village, The 22nd Street Show, Gem Mall, and the “Strip” along I-10. Every year, I try to add a “Wildcard” and see something I have never been to. I typically buy cutting rough, tools, things for my students, some finished goods and vintage components, particularly the old, dusty or unusual.

As for other human needs, I always try to eat at the Tucson Tamale Company, The Old Pueblo Grille and Sushi Cho. Lunch is typically a grab and go affair, so I make it a point to sit down for a meal and unwind at the end of the day with friends. Margaritas are, of course, a given.

Pssst: To those intrepid souls who really looked and are following me on Instagram, thanks! It’s super-fun playing with you.
Here is the weekly recap: Welcome. To. My. Studio. Are. You. Ready. To See. What.

PS: If this is a mystery to you, click on the photo under the photo of my book at upper right of this blog. It will get you there, lol.


Life’s good when you get to run it

Bob Ebendorf, Fred Gall, CoMA Conference 2014 Salida, Colorado

Sculptor Ted Gall (left) and Bob Ebendorf share a quiet moment at the podium.

I truly love metalsmithing and I’m reminded of that pure and simple fact every time I get away from the daily grind and into a group of like-minded friends. Despite what it may appear to be, very often a job can be a job, and once you discover its the things you make time and space to do on your own clock that feed your mind and your heart, life becomes so much more rewarding.

Such is the case for me now, and I have gotten to a place where I truly understand how the “important stuff” happens when you get to run it. This year, I made a pact with artist Helen to go to the annual CoMA Conference on my own time and my own dime. If you love metalsmithing and you’ve never been, I heartily recommend it — so, mark your calendar now for the third weekend of July and join.

The last time I attended CoMA was a few years ago, and I was distracted by exterior unpleasantries, the job and the duties — and as a result I was unable to experience it on my own terms as artist Helen. This time, I had to run it, because I needed this one like a desert needs rain. When you are running on empty, you’ve just got to add fuel to the tank. And even with my excellent planning, I wound up being in recovery during the conference from a somewhat unexpected major surgery, and just a bit worried about being far from home. However, courage is essential when you decide to run it, so I trusted Doc, packed my meds and braved the pain and the flight. It was so, so worth it.

pinswap, helen driggs jewelry, CoMA conference 2014, fibula

Here are my 20 pin swap pins ready to trade. Wire fibulas were about all I could produce while laying on the couch drugged and in pain as I recovered from surgery.

Headliners this year were Andy Cooperman, Barbara Heinrich, Ford + Forlano, Ted Gall, and one of my “jewelry heroes” the incredible educator/artist Bob Ebendorf. Every presenter demonstrated a signature technique, and there were additional demos, including using Delft Clay by Alex Boyd, images and videos galore, the pin swap, lunches with friends, dinners with more friends, the silent auction (I scored a sweet strand of chunky, awesome stone beads for a song), the Arkansas River kayakers, “S” Mountain, Big blue sky, Culture Clash Gallery, cold adult beverages, a fantastic and like-minded roommate, glorious sunsets, tales of rocks and cutting rough, the vendor room, and a sweet, singing canary in the breakfast room of my hotel. I also took a two-day workshop with Bob Ebendorf after the conference which totally blew off my doors.

I came home energized and excited about making work again, which is a feeling I haven’t experienced in a while because my gauge was on empty. I have been very busy and life’s been full, but I have been making and doing lots of stuff for the job, plus curriculum pieces and demos for teaching. Important, yes. But, I remembered that its also  important to make space and time for the pure and simple work you make just for the love of making it. It is essential to do that to remain whole, and CoMA helped me remember. I was also very lucky to have an excellent drive featuring a very good mentor/student exchange with Bob Ebendorf all the way to the airport. Having an exchange with someone like Bob is a blessing. Wisdom is everything. And I know now it is critical to keep my sanity by establishing crystal clear boundaries between my own personal time and artwork and the time I have sold to others.

Bob Ebendorf necklace, CoMA 2014 Post Conference Workshop

Bob Ebendorf has used every imaginable material in his work. I have never seen such an inventive use of tabs and cold connections. He is an amazing educator and I have tremendous respect for him.

The more I spend time doing what I love on my own time and dime, the more I remember how important it is to me and how much I love metalsmithing. It makes me strong to have those boundaries in play because they protect artist Helen from the big time and energy drains that can suck the life from you.

The takeaway is this: here are five things I am going to try this summer as a result of what I observed at CoMA. These were my “Ah Ha” moments and I’ll do a show and tell later on as I progress. And, I am still working on the movie in a blog thing, guys/gals, so don’t give up on me yet. I am just busy, but I will deliver, I promise. So anyway, check this:

1. Weld sterling to sterling with sterling wire, instead of using solder — courtesy of Andy Cooperman

2.  Roll print my dried oak leaf hydrangea blossoms between 2 sheets of annealed gold — Courtesy of Barbara Heinrich

3. Make a hand fabricated chain out of iron tie wire or recycled coat hangers — Courtesy of Bob Ebendorf

4. Cast something using Delft Clay — Courtesy of Alex Boyd

5. Revisit polymer clay as a jewelry medium, but wearing a ‘barrier film’ on my hands to prevent a recurrence of serious allergic dermatitis — Courtesy of Steven Ford of Ford + Forlano.

So, that’s all folks. I have a busy remainder of the summer to go, and I’ll see you at BeadFest Philadelphia if you are there.  There are some spots open in some of my classes, so check out my Teaching Dates above if you are free.

Ciao! And, enjoy the rest of the photos…

pendant

Bob Ebendorf is free and open with his demo and sample pieces. He encouraged us to shoot as many photos as we needed to take notes. He is truly an educator at heart.

bob ebendorf teaching at CoMA 2014

This is the best part of the workshop experience. I always learn best by watching a master at work. Bob Ebendorf is a wealth of information and a truly fun teacher.